NASHVILLE WARBLER

NASHVILLE WARBLER(Oreothlypis ruficapilla)

The Nashville Warbler has a grey head with a faded brown patch in the males. The sides are faded yellow and the rump white. The back and wings are green-grey. Females and juveniles have similar colors but duller. Warblers are small passerines and this one is no exception, at about 10 cm (4 in.) long. This warbler also has a distinctive white eyering.

The name ‘Nashville’ comes from the location (in Tennessee) of the first discovered specimen. The bird is only found in Tennessee during migration however.  Warblers are thus called thanks to their generally melodious songs. The genus Latin name ‘Oreothlypis’ is actually Greek and means a kind of mountain finch, and the species name  ‘ruficapilla’ refers to the brown patch on the male’s head.

As with other warblers, this one feeds on insects foraged on lower branches. It nests on the ground, in a well-camouflaged spot under a shrub.

The Nashville warbler breeds on PEI, and is fairly common on the island in spring, summer and fall. Its overall breeding range encompasses southeast Canada and northeast USA, and it winters mostly in Mexico.

Nashville Warbler - Winema National Forest, Oregon - US Fish & Wildlife Service
Nashville Warbler – Winema National Forest, Oregon – US Fish & Wildlife Service