INDIGO BUNTING

INDIGO BUNTING(Passerina cyanea)

The Indigo bunting is a passerine in the same family as the Northern cardinal, but about the size of a sparrow. The adult male in the summer is all blue except for the wings and tail, which are black with blue edges. It is brown in the winter. The female also is brown but year-round. Juvenile males are a mix of blue and brown. The bill is grey-silvery. The Latin word ‘cyanea’ means ‘deep blue’.

The indigo bunting is found on field edges near forests, and eats insects in the summer and berries in the winter. It sings melodiously from treetops.

The indigo bunting does not breed on PEI and is uncommon to rare in the spring, and only occasionally observed in the summer and fall. The Maritimes are at the northeast edge of its breeding territory. It winters in the southern USA down to northern South America.

Indigo bunting - Dunedin, PEI - May 29, 2017 - by John Read
Indigo bunting – Dunedin, PEI – May 29, 2017 – by John Read
Indigo bunting - different view - Dunedin, PEI - May 29, 2017 - by John Read
Indigo bunting – different view – Dunedin, PEI – May 29, 2017 – by John Read

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